Prion Test For Rare, Fatal Brain Disease Helps Families Cope

By the time Kay Schwister got her diagnosis last summer, she couldn’t talk anymore. But she could still scowl, and scowl she did.

After weeks of decline and no clue what was causing it, doctors had told Schwister — a 53-year-old vocational rehab counselor and mother of two from Chicago — that she had an incurable disease called Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD.

The disease was shrinking Kay’s brain, and riddling it with holes. She would likely live only a few more weeks, the doctors said.

It was a diagnosis that no one could ever want. But the fact that Schwister was able to get a firm diagnosis while still alive is a relatively new development that represents a step forward in understanding a group of devastating neurological disorders. And, some biochemists say, it could lead to better ways of diagnosing brain diseases that are much more common, including Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

For Kay Schwister, it all started in the spring of 2016, when she started getting headaches and feeling dizzy all the time. Aging, she told herself, just didn’t feel very good.

Over the next few weeks, she got steadily worse.

“She got to the point where she was so nauseous and so dizzy that she stopped driving and actually stopped working,” says her husband, Tim Schwister.

By the time Kay entered the emergency room last June, her speech had changed. She was enunciating things in a strange way, and finishing each sentence on a really high note.

Doctors drew blood and spinal fluid and tested it for things like multiple sclerosis and mercury poisoning. Those tests came back negative.

Soon, Kay couldn’t talk or walk.

“Not knowing what we were dealing with was probably one of the hardest things to ever go through in life,” says Tim. “We really wanted to know what we were up against, and if there was anything that we could do.”

Ultimately, Kay’s doctors ordered a newly developed test for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease — a very rare condition that’s thought to kill about 1 in a million people…

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