Oil stuck between $40 and $60, but price shocks possible, says Citi

But Citi thinks robust U.S. shale productivity and an improved outlook for projects in nations like Mexico, Guyana, Brazil and Canada can keep the market balanced and prices capped around $60 through 2022.

“This is contrary to the conventional wisdom forming and espoused by the likes of the IEA to the Saudis and the Russians among others, who warn that a supply gap is emerging imminently, perhaps by the end of the decade,” Citi analysts wrote.

Citi believes that U.S. shale oil has fundamentally altered the oil market, and investors now need to think about shale drillers’ ability to pump more or less to balance the market. The bank believes there is room for about 1.5 million barrels a day of growth through 2020 from U.S. shale fields, where drillers use advanced methods to free oil and gas from rock formations.

In its base case, U.S. crude prices would average around $55 a barrel through 2022.

Citi’s outlook for U.S. crude could rise by $5 a barrel if costs in the U.S. oil patch increase by more than expected. But it could also fall by $5 if productivity is better than anticipated. Inflation and productivity could also offset each other, keeping the average five-year price right around the $55 a barrel mark.

An unexpected drop of 1 million barrels a day of global production from current levels in 2018 could cause prices to jump to the $60 to $70 range.

“These supply losses could come from a return to higher levels of disrupted supply in Libya or Nigeria, falling back after the recent recovery. It could also come from new disruptions in Venezuela,” Citi said.

If supply disruptions…

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