2 people in Ontario die of opioid overdoses every day – Toronto

More than two people each day are dying of opioid overdoses in Ontario, a grim tally that underscores the soaring use and abuse of the potent narcotics, researchers say.

The rate of opioid-related deaths in the province has almost quadrupled over the last 25 years, skyrocketing to 734 in 2015 from 144 in 1991, says a report published Thursday by the Ontario Drug Policy Research Network.

“What we also found really interesting was the types of opioids involved in those deaths and how those have changed over time,” said lead author Tara Gomes, a scientist at the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences and St. Michael’s Hospital in Toronto.

Oxycodone no longer deadliest drug

Prior to 2012, oxycodone was the most common culprit in opioid-related deaths. But with the introduction of a tamper-deterrent formulation of the drug that year, oxycodone’s involvement in these deaths declined, while other opioids were found to be increasingly implicated in fatal overdoses.

“What we’ve seen is that fentanyl, hydromorphone and even heroin involvement in opioid-related deaths really started to rise at that point in time,” said Gomes.

“That’s a bit concerning because it means that simply changing access or the formulation of one type of opioid isn’t actually leading to the ultimate goal of reducing the rate of opioid-related deaths in the province,” she said. “It’s simply shifting people between the types of opioids like fentanyl and heroin.”

Ontario teen Chloe Kotval, 14, was found unresponsive after overdosing on pills laced with fentanyl and died two days later. (Neville Kotval)

Fentanyl’s contribution to opioid-related deaths soared by 548 per cent between 2006 and 2015, and it is now the most common cause of lethal overdoses among this class of powerful painkillers. Fentanyl can be obtained in both prescribed patches and illicitly manufactured pills, but the latter have only been around for the last couple of years.

“What we don’t know in Ontario is the degree to which the illicit form of fentanyl is really driving the increases we’re seeing, compared to fentanyl patches that are being prescribed by physicians and then diverted onto the street,” said Gomes, adding that B.C. has witnessed “an enormous rise” in illicit fentanyl deaths in the last two years.

Hydromorphone is the second most commonly identified drug in Ontario’s rash of overdose deaths – with its involvement climbing by 232 per cent between 2006 and 2015 -while heroin’s connection to opioid-related fatalities jumped by 975 per cent, despite small numbers overall.

Cocaine often present in blood of deceased

The report, based on 1991-2015 data obtained from the Office of the Chief Coroner for Ontario, shows that opioid-related deaths often involved other drugs that could have contributed. Post-mortem toxicology identified benzodiazepine in more than half of those who died and cocaine in almost one-third.

“The presence of these other drugs may be indicative of the…

Read the full article from the Source…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *